Best of 2017, directors, exploitation, horror, Movies, Reviews, SAVAGE CINEMA!

DARKNESS ON THE EDGE OF TOWN – HORROR HOUNDS PROWLING THE MARGINS

This started as a review of Hounds of Love, and has mutated into a meditation on genre. It’s a bit rambling, and once again I wish I could afford to pay someone to edit this stuff, but I hope those of you interested in horror and the fringes of the genre find something of interest in it. Continue reading

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british film, directors, London Film Festival, Movies, Reviews

All alone in bedsit land – Gareth Tunley’s The Ghoul reviewed

Full disclosure, I’ve known The Ghoul’s writer/director Gareth Tunley since the mid-nineties, even shared a flat together in Walthamstow. So approaching his feature debut dispassionately is not really happening.

I first saw the film a year ago before its successful festival run (The Ghoul played the London Film Festival and Mayhem in Nottingham among others), and the first thing that hit me was an overwhelming wave of relief that I didn’t have to look shifty and tell Big Daddy G ‘the cinematography is nice’ before suddenly remembering I had a bus to catch.

I had intended not to write the film up, figuring it as a conflict of interest (like the big I am that I am) and as others have done a sterling job of doing so (including such genre critics as Anton Bitel and Kim Newman in Empire Magazine.

But as The Ghoul is about to be released on the 4th August in the UK by Arrow Releasing on a limited theatrical run with a DVD and Blu Ray release following on 4th September, and as this is my blog and I’m beholden to nobody… fuck it, here’s a review of Gareth Tunley’s The Ghoul. Continue reading

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directors, Film festivals, Movies, science fiction

Lizzie Borden’s Born in Flames reignited

In my finale communiqué from the Cinema Rediscovered festival in Bristol I take a look at Lizzie Borden’s 1983 film Born in Flames. This was a major discovery for me, Lizzie Borden being a director I was not that familiar with having only seen her film Working Girls some 25 years ago whilst a student.  Continue reading

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british film, directors, documentary, exploitation, Film festivals, Movies

Event preview – Bristol’s Cinema Rediscovered weekender (27 – 30 July 2017)

I’ve recently relocated to Bristol and have found a city with vibrant film culture into which I’m currently dipping my toes. Here follows a preview of the upcoming Cinema Rediscovered festival running at the end of July. If you live in, or around Bristol there are some great screenings and events. Here is my pick… Continue reading

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directors, horror, Movies, new releases, Reviews

Post-It [Comes At Night] Notes

Claustrophobic horror thriller It Comes At Night is the latest film to land in an ongoing culture war (actually more of a skirmish between factions) for the soul of the genre, between films considered mainstream and art-house. I feel I have to write something about this about once a year. The last time being when Bret Easton Ellis went on a diatribe against ‘art horror’ coinciding with the UK release of Austrian horror movie Goodnight Mommy, you can read that here.

Such think pieces and debates are frustrating to me, as the often obscure the qualities of the film at hand. So is to worth spending your hard earned case on seeing It Comes At Night at the movies, or should you just wait for VOD or streaming?

Find out after the jump… Continue reading

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Best of 2017, crime, directors, Movies, Musicals, Reviews, thriller

Edgar Wright’s Baby Driver is pedal-to-the-metal, high velocity entertainment

Fresh from viewing just this morning – so excuse the typos I know are going to be in there – here is my review of Edgar Wright’s glorious new thriller Baby Driver. Strap in. Continue reading

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Best of 2017, biopics, directors, Movies, Reviews

“Dear Lord, help me get just one more” – Hacksaw Ridge and the hellfire of combat

There follows a review of Mel Gibson’s triumphant return to the director’s chair Hacksaw Ridge. If you are looking for a review that will psychoanalyse Gibson you will be disappointed. I am entirely unqualified to go there, and will stick to discussing the actual film. Which is terrific. If you have followed Gibson’s fall from grace (and who hasn’t?) you can see Hacksaw Ridge and draw your own conclusions as to whether it is the work of a man actively seeking redemption or not.  Continue reading

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